Sean Kalinich

Sean Kalinich

Copyright groups demand 1.2 billion from Dutch government
Published in News

There is a twisted and flawed logic to the copyright industry. They seem to think that they can hold anyone they want accountable for breaking laws. It does not matter if that person is responsible or not, they want to be able to get money from them in the hopes that they will be able to blackmail them into joining their campaign. We have seen copyright groups go after internet service providers (ISPs) content service providers (YouTube) and even force massive takedowns to get what they want. Now, we are seeing a new level of Hubris. A Copyright group is going after a government.

MIT and Texas Intruments create an RFID Chip that is secure.. for now
Published in News

The term hack-proof is one that people have thrown around for some time. It is one of those phrases like NSA-Proof or malware proof that really do not mean what they should mean. However, it is certainly meant to mean that the technology in question is resistant to the majority of known (important word there) attacks. It is important to mention this definition as we start talking about the announcement that MIT and Texas Instruments have developed a new “hack-proof” RFID chip.

AMD launches World's First Hardware Virtualized GPU
Published in News

AMD made an interesting announcement today. They are claiming to have the world’s first hardware virtualized GPU. Dubbed the FirePro S7150 and S7150 x2, these two server GPUs are not intended as direct output devices, but are to be used to power graphics for virtualized solutions. From the announcement AMD is diving into the cloud gaming, GPU assisted cloud computing and also in GPU accelerated VDI applications.

BleepingComputer hit with SLAPP suit from Enigma Software over comparrion thread.
Published in Editorials

The term SLAPP is one that most people might not be aware of. To put it bluntly SLAPP (Strategic Lawsuits Against Public Participation) lawsuits are ones that attempt to censor information or public discourse on a particular topic. The most common ones are from corporate entities that are trying to stop negative information about their products or other areas from getting out. The negative information is not slanderous or libelous in nature and in most cases can be backed up with documentation. Still the corporate minds try the threat of litigation to remove the information.

Is Virtual Reality really the next IT technology?
Published in Editorials

It is said that nature abhors a vacuum and that is certainly true. Something will come along to fill the void if we let nature take its course. Unfortunately this law is a little mutated in the consumer electronics market and especially in the PC component world. Here is reads; the market cannot stand not having an “It” technology, so we much create one. It seems that the last few years we have been watching this happen.

YouTube not liable in Germany for users' copyright infringement
Published in News

YouTube and copyright has been a controversial subject since they first hit the internet. The problem is who is liable for copyright infringement. Is it the poster or the service? The copyright gang would love to tell you it is both. They want the chance to go after the individuals and also to be sure to get financially compensated by the service provider. Sadly in the US the courts are siding with the copyright cartels for a multitude of reasons (none are based on how technology works though). In EMEA, well things are a tad different over there.

Norse Corp could be a thing of the past
Published in News
Monday, 01 February 2016 10:51

Norse Corp could be a thing of the past

Norse Corp, famous for their live attack map and Viking based parties at Black Hat, could be having some financial issues. At least that is the word from researcher Brian Krebs. Over the last couple of weeks they have laid off 30% of their staff and let their CEO go. Neither of the occurrences is good news for a company that is relatively new (Norse was founded in 2010). The basis of the business was to provide a nimble product that would allow for better threat tracking and blocking. Everything was centered on the use of live information to help prevent and mitigate attacks.

HSBC's DDoS raises questions on how companies treat these events.
Published in News

One cool thing about working in IT is that things are very predictable. You generally know how a system or application will react if you do this or that to it. This is how people find and use exploits in software and even hardware. You look at how an application works and identify ways you can use those processes against it. It is like digital judo. However, what many people do not really get is that this also works when setting up a larger organization for an attack. If you can track how they will respond to a particular threat, you can use it against them in very interesting ways.

Anaheim Police caught using DRT Cell Simulators to listen in on calls
Published in News

Law Enforcement surveillance is a necessary thing. It really is, but what is not necessary is when the agencies in question decide to get lazy or feel their powers extend to a larger group of people than their intended targets. This is when things get messy and from a legal stand point ugly. Over the last ten or so years law enforcement in general has made the decision to extend their surveillance programs into mass collection of data.

TOR releases version 5.5 of the TOR Browser Bundle; bug fixes galore
Published in News

Tor has pushed out a new version of its privacy enhancing Tor Browser Bundle. We are up to 5.5 now and, according to the Tor Project it is a full stable release. The update fixes a laundry list of bugs and also covers some usability issues that have been plaguing the software for some time. One interesting note is that they are finally working on blocking ways of fingerprinting users through different mechanisms (resolution, keyboard type etc.).