IntroHere at DecryptedTech we have always had covered a very wide range of products (as well as technologies). However, there is one item that we have never really gotten too deep into. This is direct attached storage and in particular Solid State Drives (SSDs). It is true that we do show you their performance in almost every motherboard review that we do here on the site, but we have never reviewed any SSDs exclusively. We have had many reasons for this not the last of which is there is still debate on how to properly test an SSD or HDD. While some feel that IOPs (Input Output Operations per Second) are key others want to know exactly how fast their data moves into and out of the drive. We sat down and have come up with what we hope is a good balance of synthetic and real world tests that will give you the best idea of how an SSD performs. So with that in mind we are going to dive into Kingston’s HyperX SH100S3B/120G 120GB Solid Sate Drive Upgrade Kit.

84There is a long standing myth that PCs are susceptible to viruses and malware while Macs and Linux are not. Unfortunately for anyone that believes this myth there are consequences. One of these is a feeling of invulnerability when browsing. This false sense of security can lead to many things, including having your computer hijacked or being silently rolled into a giant Mac only botnet … I am sure you get my point. This phenomenon is not limited to Mac owners. PC owners that have “Full” Virus and Malware protection also get this false sense of security.

Now, the interesting thing is that while there are literally thousands of viruses and malware for Windows based systems in the wild there are actually more security loop holes in OSX that can be exploited by something as simple as a drive-by or other malformed code on a web page. One that caught our attention was an Adobe based Exploit (yes I know Steve Jobs wanted to ban Adobe). This little exploit allows someone to run a .swf file in a hidden iFrame. The .swf in question here has code to authorize turning on the end users webcam and broadcasting it to the source server.

Now this is nothing new and I have witnessed this kind of thing done at different security conventions. The thing that really is concerning is that this is being run on a version of Flash that is supposed to have code (called frame busting) to prevent this. What happened is that Adobe only patched part of the hole. They covered the whole page being loaded in an iFrame, but forgot to prevent the malformed .swf from being loaded into that same space. This little exploit was found by a computer science student at Stanford University named Feross Aboukhadjeh.

Now I know you are wondering what my rant at the beginning of this article about Macs has to do with this exploit… Well the kicker is that Aboukhadjeh has only been able to get this exploit to work on Macs and running either Firefox or Safari. The reason that he has been so successful is that with these browsers and OSX it is easier to make the iFrame transparent to the end user. Aboukhadjeh says that he does believe that this will work on other operating systems, but that it will take significantly more effort and would require layering the frame to avoid detection.

Adobe has been notified of the exploit

Source The Inquirer

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sam810llogoscreen

After Samsung  introduced the first "vertical" 3D memory chip earlier this month it did not take long for the first concrete product using this technology to appear. They launched SSDs of 960 and 480 GB, which are designed for enterprise servers and data centers.

Published in News
Saturday, 12 January 2013 20:53

Kingston at CES 2013

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Las Vegas, NV, CES 2013 – One of our must see companies at CES is Kingston. We have been partnered with Kingston since early 2006 and they are truly one of our favorite companies not only for the things they do, but also for the people that are behind the PR. Yesterday we stopped by their showroom (they had a half ballroom at Caesar’s Palace to see what they had going on. When we walked we saw quite a few displays that contained the history of Kingston Memory and storage products. These cases were quite full considering the fact that Kingston is 20 years old and their HyperX line of memory products is 10 (their first HyperX memory module was DDR… just DDR). However they have come a long way and are now one of (if not the) leading memory and flash storage company in the world.

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Mosaid-HLSSD

Last week Mosaid showed off a prototype of their new solid state drive which boasts a massive 2TB capacity. The new Solid-State Drive (SSD) is able to do what conventional solid state drives are able to do only in a more cost effective way. Mosiad has managed to reduce the number of controllers and channels per drive while increasing the capacity and throughput of the drives. If they are able to push this out into the market it will be a big hit in many high-performance systems and no we are not talking about your gaming box.

Published in News
Wednesday, 11 September 2013 08:46

Bigger, Faster, Cheaper Flash in Demand But Cold?

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“By the time you get this message, I'll be in the dead zone.” – Capa, “Sunshine,” DNA Films, 2007
You have to wonder if this year’s Flash Memory Summit (FMS) didn’t have Al Shugart, a hard drive pioneer, spinning in his grave.
There are a whole lot of silicon engineers hell-bent on moving his technology to a dusty corner of the Computer Museum.
Shugart was a key developer of IBM’s RAMAC (Random Access Method of Accounting and Control) disk system that stored a whopping 5MB of data. Today, no kid would look twice at a smartphone or tablet if it didn’t have at least 32GB (1GB = 1,024MB).

Published in Editorials
Wednesday, 15 August 2012 12:29

So long Adobe Flash

HTML5vsFlash

As of today, Adobe's Flash is officially removed from Google Play. They announced last November “we are focusing our work with Flash on PC browsing and mobile apps packaged with Adobe AIR, and will be discontinuing our development of the Flash Player for mobile browsers.“ Android 4.1 wont have any certified implementations of Flash Player. Adobe will use configuration settings in the Google Play Store to limit continued access to Flash Player updates to only those devices that already have Flash Player installed.

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MS-Myth

In only a few weeks Microsoft could find themselves in something of a bind as they appear to have forgotten quite a bit about security while trying to make sure that their new OS can work with their cloud services. Since the release of the “build” version of Windows 8 we have been picking through the way that it operates and how its system function. We have found more than a few items of concern; some of which have finally been fixed, others have not. One of our primary concerns is the semi-walled garden that Microsoft is putting Merto/Modern apps into in order to prevent the side loading of apps that are not from the Microsoft Store, but which also prevents proper malware protection from working.

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The Flash Memory Summit wound down on Thursday after a four day run at the Santa Clara Convention Center in San Jose. The show floor was fairly crowded with over 5,000 attendees and a sold out exhibition space.

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News light-virus-1

There is nothing like finding a new bug in a patch that is meant to fix another one. This appears to be something that Oracle has done though. After releasing a rushed security patch for a rather serious vulnerability in Java the same company that found the first flaw, Security Explorations, has found another one. The first flaw affected any web browser that had the Java plug-in running and extended across multiple operating systems as well. It was the sort of flaw that everyone remembers when the security of someone’s products is brought up. Having a single major vulnerability in your software (and with malware that uses it in the wild) is bad enough, but to find another one in your most recent version is just bad news.

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