14621rotten apple

Since the introduction of Apple’s iADs Apple has been pushing for more efficient ways to track user habits to attract advertising money. In fact during the introduction of iADs Steve Jobs noted that establishing rich ad content was one of the main reasons for moving to HTML5. The demo was mostly lost on the journalists that were present at the event (and those that watched the live streaming) as an ad service is not exactly a selling point to consumers. On top of that one of the methods that Apple used to help advertisers track user preferences for targeted ads, the Unique Device Identifier (UDID), was quickly abused by app developers as well as others to tie a person to a device for tracking and also to scavenge personal information (like contacts). It was a mess for iPhone owners and Apple alike.

Joker

Someone is claiming that the one million UDIDs posted by Anonymous actually were taken from them and not the FBI or Apple. The company Blue Toad from Orlando FL says that they checked the pastebin file and it was a 98% match for their database. This is an interesting twist in the events that have seen Apple, the FBI and even AT&T linked to surveillance of Apple phones through the use of the UDID (Unique Device IDentifier). Apple has already stated that the UDID will no longer be supported in the next version of their iOS software that is expected to be released to the world tomorrow.

Anon-02

Yesterday the Internet was caught up in the fact that for some reason an FBI Special Agent had 12 Million Apple UDIDs (Unique Device IDentifiers) along with connected personal information on his laptop. At the time the reports appeared to indicate that this was an FBI-Issued laptop and not a personal one. This small detail was overshadowed by many due to how the information was uncovered. A group known as AntiSec, who is part of the larger Anonymous collective, claimed that they found it after hacking into the agent’s laptop using a fairly common tool.