805ub02

Since its introduction there has been something of an internal battle with wireless. On the one hand it is very convenient; you just connect to an access point and you have freedom as long as you are inside the network rand. On the other the speed is not always that great and, if the signal is too weak, you can end up dropping packets, files and losing data. Over the years there have been great improvements in wireless speed, but no matter what it has never been able to match the speed of a wired connection. At least it could not until 802.11ac wireless arrived on the scene. This new specification offers a theoretical limit of 1.3Gbps over a 5GHz wireless connection. We have already taken a look at a router and USB 2.0 adapter, now we are going to look at what happens when you put USB 3.0 into the mix with the TRENDNet TEW-805UB adapter.

Monday, 12 August 2013 17:31

Problems with GPS on the new Nexus 7

nexus7

Quite a lot of users have posted their complains about various problems on the Google Mobile Help Forum with the use of satellite navigation built into the new Nexus 7 tablet, which was made by Asus for Google this time. Among the problems they referred the cases of complete inability to use GPS navigation, as well as the termination of GPS functionality after 2, 5, 10, or 30 minutes.

Sunday, 23 June 2013 19:49

Logitech gives up on selling Harmony

logitech-harmony-ultimate

Logitech gave up from giving up the unit in charge of developing and selling line of universal remotes by the name Harmony. Looks like they like to listen to their users and believe that they still have interest in this branch of devices.

intro

When wireless networking was first introduced it was a very cool concept and people bought into it. The problem was that it was also about as slow as dial-up internet was. The good news is that all technologies advance and wireless was non exception. Once the idea caught on we quickly ramped up in speed, but wireless was never quite able to keep up with a wired connection. We saw these connections leap ahead by a factor of 10 while wireless had small incremental speed jumps. All of that changed in 2011 when researchers built up the next specification for wireless speed, 802.11ac. This speed increase more than doubled what wireless was able to do previously. Suddenly wireless was just as fast as a wired connection (in theory). We have a few routers and adapters in the lab and will be taking a look at them. Today we are going to show you the TRENDNet TEW-812DRU AC1750 dual band wireless router.

04

802.11ac wireless was introduced at CES 2012. Unfortunately when the devices were launched there were no adapters to support it. This meant that people were buying expensive wireless products without having any way to support the speeds they were capable of. Fortunately at CES 2013 a couple of manufacturers started releasing 802.11ac adapters. However, there are two schools of thought about how to implement these adapters. We will be taking a look at both in the next couple of weeks, but we will kick things off with a look at the USB 2.0 NETGEAR A6200 Dual Band 802.11ac WiFi Adapter. Let’s dive in and take a look.

Fiber Optics

Samsung has announced a breakthrough in cellular technology that should help us get to 1Gbps on a cellular network by 2020. The new network is, of course, going to be called 5G and represents a huge improvement over current data transmission rates. What is interesting about the announcement is that we are now seeing a similar technology available in the form of 802.11ac for the home. Does Samsung’s break through show how cellular and traditional wireless have become the same technology?

backside

Belkin has released a handy addition for those who want the option of wireless streaming of music in their homes. Belkin HD Bluetooth Music Receiver is a tiny device designed to add features of Bluetooth streaming music from your smart phone or tablet to your existing audio system.

Thursday, 29 November 2012 18:39

Ericsson sues Samsung

patents

Another day, another patent law suit against Samsung. The company has been sued by Ericsson inU.S. Court. This time the lawsuit is about "key patents in mobile technologies." Looks like Samsung can’t stop getting into patent lawsuits, they already had to pay Apple $1 billion, will the same thing happen with Ericsson? [The $1 billion judgment in favor of Apple is not final and at least one patent from that trial is under review - Ed]

Saturday, 10 November 2012 16:36

Wireless Encryption, Or How Secure is Secure

Code

Suppose I have a picture that I have been given. This picture is not something that the owner wants shown to the world so they have given me a list of people that can see it. When someone wants to see it I ask them who they are and if their name is on the list I show it to them. However, this plan is not working out that well so the owner decides to add some requirements. Now when someone wants to see the picture they have to show ID. Still people are getting around that with fake IDs, so now the owner gives out a special code word that is unique to each person while still maintaining the requirement for ID. To make things even more secure I have a picture of each person and a copy of their ID. What I have described here is a very simple explanation of the way that some of the different levels of encryption work; from the very basic to much more complex routines. In this article we will be talking about encryption as it relates to wireless access points and we can tell you up front you will be surprised at how insecure some of them are.

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When it comes to technology there are things that we as consumers just expect to work. We do not have the time, or even the inclination, to worry about the details on these items, we just want to plug them in and go. One of these is our networking products, and in particular wireless networking. We see a device with the letter “n” on it and we automatically assume it is going to give us 300Mbps (Megabits Per Second). The problem with this approach is that wireless technology is as varied as versions of Windows 7 (another item we lump into one group… but that is another article) and cannot all be lumped into one category because of a specification number or letter on the box. With this in mind we are going to talk about some of the major points of wireless networking and how to spot the pretenders from products with real performance.