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Microsoft cuts Windows 8.x prices by up to 70%

by on26 February 2014 2419 times

It seems that Windows 8.x is not selling as well as Microsoft would like it to. After boasting about how game changing the new OS would be for end users, the only game that seems to be changing is Microsoft’s revenue stream. Just before the new OS came out we talked about the impact of Windows 8 on OEMs especially with Microsoft entering into direct competition. Most OEMs were not happy about the licensing costs they would have to pay for Windows 8/RT and felt that Microsoft’s entry would make things even more unfair.

This was especially true when it came Windows RT and lower end tablets. The high cost of Windows licensing forced many manufacturers to take a loss on their products or not use Windows. As the popularity of the OS began to falter we saw companies moving back to Android or even Chrome for their entry level products. We imagine that Microsoft did not want to lose to Google on two fronts so they had to make a decision. In the end they are probably going to lose a little money in an effort to bring back sales and adoption rates for Windows 8.x products.

This new change in pricing structure comes shortly after Microsoft cut the price of the Xbox One to match the price of the PS4. It shows an acceptance by Microsoft that their plans might be meeting with both consumer and OEM resistance. This could be good for consumers in the long run (and not just in savings). We all know that the dollar is king when it comes to corporate decisions. If sales are hurting enough it could motivate Microsoft to make changes in other areas of the company to regain consumer trust. Some of the most common ones that we have heard are; removing the requirement for the Kinect and lower the Xbox One price, allow for different install types in Windows 8 for tablets and desktops, allow better developer access to the desktop in Windows “RT”, and allow “modernUI” applications to run on the desktop in a windows.

Who knows, if sales fall enough some of these change could become reality.

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Last modified on 26 February 2014
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