Copyright groups demand 1.2 billion from Dutch government
Published in News

There is a twisted and flawed logic to the copyright industry. They seem to think that they can hold anyone they want accountable for breaking laws. It does not matter if that person is responsible or not, they want to be able to get money from them in the hopes that they will be able to blackmail them into joining their campaign. We have seen copyright groups go after internet service providers (ISPs) content service providers (YouTube) and even force massive takedowns to get what they want. Now, we are seeing a new level of Hubris. A Copyright group is going after a government.

Jollyroger-1

For a number of years we have talked about the way the copyright industry (and the laws they have fostered) have been the number one source of the growth of piracy. These groups, designed to “protect” rights holders are so blind in their efforts to maintain a high (and growing) revenue stream that they often forget the impact on legitimate users. When these impacts and restrictions become too great these legitimate users will turn to alternative means to get the items they want. One very widely published incident was with EA and their DRM (Digital Rights Management) software on the popular game Spore. The DRM was limited to three installs and often locked people out during their first installation. Because this DRM was so restrictive people that legally purchased the game went out and downloaded copies just so they could install it when they wanted.