DecryptedTech

Monday15 August 2022

Displaying items by tag: okta

The breach of IDAM group Okta in January by the self-promoting group Lapsus$ amidst other high-profile breaches and data leaks this year was a significant concern. The concern rose because when the incident first happened, Okta passed it off as an unsuccessful attempt to breach a third-party vendor’s system that had access to Okta systems. However, in March the Lapsus$ group released screenshots of internal systems including what appeared to be Okta’s superuser system.

Published in Security Talk

Over the weekend news surfaced that indicated users of Trezor hardware crypto wallets had received emails claiming Trezor had been breached and urging the user to reset their PIN as soon as possible. The emails turned out to be a phishing campaign that leveraged the compromise of MailChimp marketing tools. The latter was confirmed by MailChimp on Sunday after Trezor made the statement following the large number of reports on the phishing emails.

Published in Security Talk

Lat week we reported on the quick change in Okta’s stance on a January security incident that turned out to be much larger and have the volatile hacking group Lapsus$ behind it. The original disclosure was that a single third-party contractor account had an unsuccessful attempt to compromise Okta’s systems. Okta states that they turned over information around the incident to Sitel, the third-party that provides customer support. Once this was done, Okta basically washed their hands of it and sat back waiting to hear what Sitel found.

Published in Security Talk
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On the 22nd of March Okta finally confirmed that they were breached in January for a period of 5 days. The breach, according to information now disclosed, happened due to the compromise of an account of a support engineer. The compromised user was not an Okta employee but belonged to a third party engineer working for Sitel. This event was downplayed by Okta as they claimed only the account was impacted and no clients were known to be exposed at the time.

Published in Security Talk

Earlier today we covered the leak of Microsoft source code by the Lapsus$ group. The group leaked a portion of the data they claim to have stolen in the form of a 37GB dump. This dump has added to the source code they have stolen and released from companies like NVIDIA and Samsung. Lapsus$ has a pattern of compromising an organization, stealing data and then demanding money to not release the information, only to release the information anyway.

Published in Security Talk